Geek Girl Playground

A place to celebrate all the geeky things I love and/or hate. Depends on the day and my mood.
allakinwande:

Elizabeth Jennings Graham photo source: Kansas Historical Foundation, photo circa 1854-1860
(1830-1901) Elizabeth Jennings was a New York City schoolteacher whose 1854 defiance of a streetcar conductor’s order to leave his car helped desegregate public transit in New York City. With the help of her prominent father, the wealthy businessman Thomas L. Jennings, she filed and won a lawsuit against the streetcar company. Thomas L. Jennings, the first African-American to win a patent, owned a large clothing store and co-founded the famous Abyssinian Baptist Church. He used most of his profits in the fight against slavery and racism, founding a Legal Rights Association, which fought for civil rights through the courts. The association’s first case was his daughter’s. The judge in her case issued a ruling that prohibited discrimination in public transit against blacks. Chester A. Arthur, who later become the 21st President of the United States was her attorney. While she won her suit, only after blacks won another anti-discrimination lawsuit in 1859, did New York City’s public transit substantially desegregate. Later, with school’s remaining segregated, Jennings founded New York City’s first black kindergarten. — Sources: Speak out in Thunder Tones, Letters and Other Writings by Black Northerners 1787-1865 and The New York Times

allakinwande:

Elizabeth Jennings Graham photo source: Kansas Historical Foundation, photo circa 1854-1860

(1830-1901) Elizabeth Jennings was a New York City schoolteacher whose 1854 defiance of a streetcar conductor’s order to leave his car helped desegregate public transit in New York City. With the help of her prominent father, the wealthy businessman Thomas L. Jennings, she filed and won a lawsuit against the streetcar company. Thomas L. Jennings, the first African-American to win a patent, owned a large clothing store and co-founded the famous Abyssinian Baptist Church. He used most of his profits in the fight against slavery and racism, founding a Legal Rights Association, which fought for civil rights through the courts. The association’s first case was his daughter’s. The judge in her case issued a ruling that prohibited discrimination in public transit against blacks. Chester A. Arthur, who later become the 21st President of the United States was her attorney. While she won her suit, only after blacks won another anti-discrimination lawsuit in 1859, did New York City’s public transit substantially desegregate. Later, with school’s remaining segregated, Jennings founded New York City’s first black kindergarten. — Sources: Speak out in Thunder Tones, Letters and Other Writings by Black Northerners 1787-1865 and The New York Times

(via givemeunicorns)

moonfalora:

rexuality:

a person complaining about puns basically invites every pun enthusiast in the vicinity to come snapping rhythmically from the shadows 

image

(via luchia13)

cracked:

There’s a big difference in saying, “There’s a flaw in your argument, and it’s relevant for this reason,” and, “You are making a stupid error, and here are some Latin words to make you feel stupider.”
5 Common Argument Tactics That Need to Die

#5. Accusing Someone of Using a Logical Fallacy
Understanding logical fallacies is an important skill, because the human brain is a flawed machine notoriously bad at picking out mistakes. But — and this is important — it’s a passive trait. You can’t use your knowledge of logical fallacies to debate somebody, because whether or not someone is using a logical fallacy has little to do with whether or not they’re right. And if you don’t believe me, then you’re making a logical fallacy. Possibly even two of them.

Read More

cracked:

There’s a big difference in saying, “There’s a flaw in your argument, and it’s relevant for this reason,” and, “You are making a stupid error, and here are some Latin words to make you feel stupider.”

5 Common Argument Tactics That Need to Die

#5. Accusing Someone of Using a Logical Fallacy

Understanding logical fallacies is an important skill, because the human brain is a flawed machine notoriously bad at picking out mistakes. But — and this is important — it’s a passive trait. You can’t use your knowledge of logical fallacies to debate somebody, because whether or not someone is using a logical fallacy has little to do with whether or not they’re right. And if you don’t believe me, then you’re making a logical fallacy. Possibly even two of them.

Read More

akafoxxcub:

lillyjkforreal:

jeremyleerennerdotcom:

"let’s see … i’d rather give someone a smile than a punch in the face. that’s me. will that do?"
 - jeremy renner describes himself in one sentence

You little shit, just stop it.
Seriously.
Never stop.

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

akafoxxcub:

lillyjkforreal:

jeremyleerennerdotcom:

"let’s see … i’d rather give someone a smile than a punch in the face. that’s me. will that do?"

 - jeremy renner describes himself in one sentence

You little shit, just stop it.

Seriously.

Never stop.

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

(via doihavetodothings)